Children with No Home
In the United States, there is a significant need for African American children to be placed in homecare and in an adoptive home. .Even after the Multiethnic Placement Act and other plans and policies have been put in place for some years now, there is still a need. There has been a hold out to find the perfect family – instead of focusing on whether the adoptive parents or guardians would provide a good and safe environment for the child. The number of African American adoptions is significantly lower than that of white or even other minority children. In this article Ruth McRoy and Amy Griffin, explain what is happening to these children.
In the article Transracial adoption policies and practices Ruth McRoy, who is a Donahue and DiFelice Endowed Professor at Boston College, and Amy Griffin, who has a PhD at Boston College Graduate School of Social Work, discuss the difficulty of finding permanent homes for minority children in the US and the UK. Since there are laws that require social workers to consider, ethnicity religion culture, and language, it makes it harder to find a permanent home for these children. There are policies put in place to consider the ethnic background and of not only the child but the potential adoptive family too. In the essay, they give their take on what could be done in order to increase the amount of African American adoptions. Things like making the adoptive family prepared to adequately provide for the child whatever the child may need. Not just placing the child in a good home, but also in a home that understands and embrace the ethnicity and religious background of the adoptive child. “Families need to be adequately prepared for potential questions, discrimination and also connecting with their child on inherent differences.” Roy and Griffin State. (McRoy) They also think that “Alternative ideas for agencies better to work with MEPA-IEP could be to employ African American staff, provide training for…