Date:  
To:  
From:  
Subject:  
 
Introduction 
The following memo attempts to contrast the concept of a “Global” enterprise as modeled by 
the authors B. Kogut in “What Makes a Company Global?” a Review of The Myth of the Global 
Corporation,  M.  Mangelsdorf  in  “Building  a  Transnational  Company”,  INC.  Magazine  1993, 
Bartlett  and  Ghoshal  in  “Managing  across  boarders  New  Strategic  Requirements”,  Sloan 
Management  Review,  Summer  1987  and  Johan  Lembke  in  “Global  competition  in  the 
information and communication technology Industry…”, Business and Politics, v.4,#1, 2002. The 
contrast discussion will form around five factors identified as fundamental to operating across 
nations. 
Factor #1: The Significance of National Origin 
The  authors  appear  to  be  evenly  divided  regarding  the  role  the  nation  of  origin  plays  in  the 
formation,  comparative  advantage  and  effective  operation  of  a  global  industry.  Kogut  and 
Mangelsdorf believe the nation plays a significant role in structure and operation. Kogut forms 
his entire article on the notion that the 
nationality of an enterprise is the sole determinate of comparative advantage. His theory is that 
if global markets remain free, nations will become elements of a global value chain. Kogut’s only 
variable  for  a  global  enterprise  is  how  much  to  converge  the  various  national  operations. 
Conversely, Bartlett and Ghoshal (B&G) and most particularly, Lembke, indicate that the nation 
should not have to play a determining role in the enterprise. Rather B&G present the notion of 
the “Transnational” (Bartlett and Ghoshal 1989) enterprise. The enterprise that is able to reap 
the  benefits  of  each  nation  locations  expertise,  yet  share  this  expertise  among  all  locations 
forming  a  singular,  responsive  organization.  Lembke  takes  the  transparency  of  the  nation  to  a …